Increase in world crises anticipated in 2016

El Nino is predicted to trigger world crises in 2016. An article from Reuters identifies regions of the world that will be greatly affected by the weather phenomenon.

The United Nations is predicting that “at least 87 million people in dozens of countries will require humanitarian aid next year, and is seeking a record $20.1 billion to meet their needs.”

Read more here: Syria to South Sudan: aid groups list their top humanitarian concerns for 2016

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UN funds project to help poor countries adjust to climate change

The United Nations’ Green Climate Fund is aimed at helping poor countries adjust to climate change. The initiative will fund projects including: the development of clean energy technology, an education program on the potential impact of climate change, solutions to water shortages and projects to preserve wetlands.

Read more on The Green Climate Fund in the articles below:

Yahoo News – U.N. climate fund approves first projects ahead of Paris summit

Bloomberg News – UN Green Climate Fund Approves First Projects for $168 Million

 

 

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Worldwide Water Education at World Water Week

 

This week, people from around the world are gathering in Stockholm for World Water Week. This year’s theme focuses on ‘water for development’, but the conversation should begin with water education. More than 650 million people worldwide lack access to clean water. That’s one in ten. The statistics point to a global crisis. However, the concentration of water poverty is primarily centralized in under-developed and developing countries, meaning education is key to alert prominent world figures in developed nations to the growing problem.

 

Barbara Frost, Chief Executive of WaterAid, recently published an article in The Huffington Post calling for a prioritization of water issues, including access to clean water, better sanitation and water education. Read more here: Wising Up About Water

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Dirty water sickens rowers at pre-Olympic events in Brazil

The 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil are less than a year months away. But, Olympic hopefuls are already feeling the effects of the country’s water crisis.

Thirteen rowers on the U.S. team competing in the World Junior Rowing Championships are suffering from a stomach illness. Officials are not certain of the cause but linked the illness to the course, drinking water, bottled water and/or food contamination.

Last month, The Associated Press published the results of water quality analysis showing high levels of bacteria from human sewage at many of the water venues, including the rowing venue.

Read more of The Associated Press‘ story on NBC News here: Dirty Water Blamed for Sick Rowers at Brazil Olympic Trial

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EPA Says It Released 3 Million Gallons Of Contaminated Water Into River – From WGBH News

In an event that has led to health warnings and turned a river orange, the Environmental Protection Agency says one of its safety teams accidentally released contaminated water from a mine into the Animas River in southwest Colorado.

The spill, which sent heavy metals, arsenic and other contaminants into a waterway that flows into the San Juan National Forest, occurred Wednesday. The EPA initially said 1 million gallons of wastewater had been released, but that figure has risen sharply.

Read more of Bill Chappell’s article here: EPA Says It Released 3 Million Gallons Of Contaminated Water Into River

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Charitable organization brings fresh water to girls school in Kenya

Not long ago, the young women of Shisango Girls School in Kakamega, Kenya would spend each morning searching for water before reporting to school. They would arrive to school tired and in pain.

This year, The Water Project, a non-profit organization bringing relief to global communities suffering from a lack of access to clean water and sanitation, provided a water well to the school. The well now serves as the school’s main source of fresh water to use for washing, drinking and sanitation.

Watch here: The Water Project: Meet Florence Okomo

 

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Is the world’s fresh water supply running out?

The water crisis is a global problem. Around the world, countries are struggling with severe droughts, water shortages, and a lack of potable water. How did we get here? What can be done to prevent further water shortages?

PBS News Hour discusses these questions and more in an interview with Jay Famiglietti, Senior Water Scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology and the leading voice on the growing need for action in the world water crisis.

Watch PBS News Hour’s report here: Is the world’s fresh water supply running out?

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UAE seeks alternative methods for water production

The United Arab Emirates is one of the driest countries on Earth with an annual rainfall of only three inches per year. To prevent a water crisis, the country’s National Center of Meteorology and Seismology (NCMS) is investigating alternative methods for water production. One such method would use radar technology to determine if weather clouds can be “seeded” to trigger rainfall. According to an Arab News article, this technology has previously been used in Colorado to produce snowfall at ski resorts and in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Read more here: Arab News: Rain-starved UAE sees silver lining in cloud seeding

 

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