Puerto Rico is running out of water

On Monday, Puerto Rico went into default for the first time in history. Another crisis is looming. The country is running out of water.

The government has already imposed water restrictions, including a mandatory water shut off for 48 hours at a time. Residents are hoarding water during the 24-hour “on” periods, filling up buckets and tubs to store for the “off” hours. But the hot weather can quickly turn a bucket of fresh water into a breeding ground for mosquitoes and waterborne diseases.

CNN‘s Patrick Gillespie examines Puerto Rico’s water crisis in ‘Puerto Rico’s other crisis: It’s running out of water.’

Read more here: Puerto Rico’s other crisis: It’s running out of water

 

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New York Times article – How the West Overcounts Its Water Supplies

In this New York Times article, Abrahm Lustgarten discusses the water crisis affecting the western part of the United States. He examines how overuse of underground aquifers is contributing to the severe water shortage across the region, including California and Arizona.

Officials are trying to prevent further shortages by restricting water usage and enforcing severe penalties on those who overuse. But, is that enough? Will demand continue to exceed its replenishment?

Read more here: New York Times: How the West Overcounts Its Water Supplies

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‘Nonpoint’ Water Pollution – Part II of the WGBH ‘Water Pressure’ Series

In the second installment of the WGBH series ‘Water Pressure: Saving A Threatened Resource’, journalist Rupa Shenoy discusses ‘nonpoint’ water pollution, specifically addressing how trash, litter and human waste negatively impact our natural waterways and marine life.

Read more here: Stop Putting Stuff On The Ground — It All Adds To ‘Nonpoint’ Water Pollution

The six-part web series is a partnership between WGBH Boston and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences to call attention to water as the world’s most critical resource. An overview of the series is available here:  Water Pressure: Saving A Threatened Resource

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WGBH Series focuses on ‘Water Pressure: Saving A Threatened Resource’

WGBH Boston has partnered with the American Academy of Arts & Sciences to produce a web series called ‘Water Pressure: Saving A Threatened Resource’ discussing water and the growing need to re-focus attention on this critical resource.

The six-part web series kicked off Monday with Part 1 examining the extreme weather conditions across the United States and how severe drought in California impacts snow accumulation in New England. Why should New Englanders be concerned with the California water crisis? Read more here: California’s Missing Water Fell On Boston Instead, As Snow

The entire series is available here: Water Pressure: Saving A Threatened Resource

 

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