Ten Water and Security Hot Spots

Circle of Blue recently identified ten global hot spots where water resources are at the greatest risk of escalating to an issue of national security. Climate change, drought, low rainfall and pollution have heightened awareness around the world’s increasing need for fresh water resources. As water shortages elevate to crisis-level, countries worldwide are scrambling to identifty and claim fresh water resources.

Read more here: Infographic: Water and Security Hot Spots 2016

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Australia offers policy changes to aid California water crisis

California lawmakers have looked ‘Down Under’ for potential solutions to the state’s water crisis. Australia is an expert on the topic, having endured a 13-year drought that ended in 2010. During that time, the country made revamped its water policies to cut back water use, find more sustainable water resources and build an efficient infrastructure.

Read more here: Lawmakers look Down Under to help state get over the drought

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Climate change, persistent flooding impacts Alexandria’s water resources

Climate change may be to blame for persistent flooding in Egypt’s second-largest city, says the World Bank. The city has been burdened by recent heavy rainfall, five times the normal October total. Officials point to a failing water infrastructure, which has compounded the flooding and has caused at least five deaths.

Officials warn the persistent flooding may also impact agriculture and drinking water. Since Alexandria lies low to sea-level, there is a significant risk for seawater to infiltrate the city’s fresh water system. Without an alternative fresh water resource, the possibility could mean catastrophe for a city already in the midst of a crisis.

Read more here: Egypt: Alexandria flooding may be new norm because of climate change

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El Nino to blame for water shortage in Vietnam

El Nino is to blame for low rainfall and a shortened rainy season in Vietnam. The water level in the Dau Tieng Reservoir is much lower as a result. Experts warn that 10 million people will be affected if fresh water resources are reduced or shut off. Resources will be prioritized for tap water services first, then aquatic farms, meaning crop farmers (such as rice) to identify other alternatives during the water crisis.

Read more here: Water crisis looms as short monsoon, El Nino hit southern reservoir

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Afghanistan, Iran battle for water

A river is becoming a focal point of ongoing tensions between Afghanistan and Iran. The Hari Rud river forms a natural border between the two countries, and serves as a precious resource of potable water. But, Afghan villagers claim Iranian soldiers are preventing them access to the river.

The security of fresh water resources is a top priority in the Middle East, particularly where there is ongoing tension over borders and where there is a dire need for fresh water resources.

Read more here: The rising costs of water: dire consequences for Afghans in battle with Iranians

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